Posted in Of Culturel

Of Words

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Words

I hate the word ‘crush‘. I can’t begin to describe how much I hate it. It’s so difficult to say. You push a ball of air into your throat, and before you can expel it, you have to join your dental set and add a -shh to it. Ugh.

I hate all its meanings. Why not say trample, or squeeze (actually, squeeze is kind of icky too. Icky is icky too.) or drink or admiration? If I could, I would erase that word from the history of the English language. But, I bet a few people will be crushed to see it go.

Words are like clothes. Or food. Sure, we need them, but not any would do. We have our own style. Our own taste. Our own preferences and personalities.

But, we behave as though words are like air. Everyone has to conform, because they are our basic means of communication. Because words are always something given. You use them outwardly. They come to you, but that’s not under your control. They ask you to be wordwise, because using words wisely can create success for you in any given situation. And that includes saying nothing at all.

But, c’mon, some words just have to go. Below, I have a table for you sourced from The Independent, listing the most hated words in the English language from several countries across the world:

UK USA Canada Australia India Netherlands Germany Spain
moist

no

like

Brexit

nice

moist

no

hate

stupid

like

moist

no

hate

like

can’t

moist

no

hate

panties

like

love

sorry

no

hate

good

no

moist

war

cancer

love

no

love

hate

yes

bad

hello

yes

no

bad

you

Before I get to my own country, I think I better start taking Spanish lessons. How would an English-speaking person survive in Spain without – hello yes no bad you? Some greetings do annoy me, like people saying “Hi!” when we aren’t on hi terms yet (don’t even get me started on the hi-five). But, I thought Hello was pretty neutral, wherever you go. While yes and no seems to be a common feature (perhaps, they’re too mainstream. Yeah and Nope might just be the future full-time), how would you survive without a you? Or tell your waiter, “this dish I can’t pronounce is bad”?

Interesting how India and Germany are the only two to hate both love and hate. Modern Germany has been described as having some of the loveliest, most receptive people, while India is the land of Bollywood, of whose staple is romance. We’re a rather enthusiastic bunch who wear our hearts on our sleeves (yours truly is a bit more embarrassed and conflicted than others she knows), though of course, these are massive generalizations.

All I’m saying is, I’m rather surprised to find that love is the number 1 word Indians hate, but I guess it’s because the word is too boring and too small for the emotion we feel. Though the Hindi word for love, pyaar, is equally monosyllabic, the Bengali bhalobasha is four syllables long and a rather tough one to pronounce, even for someone who has been saying it all her life.

I see moist is pretty unpopular, though it would have never occurred to me. Which is strange, considering how humid it is here, and moisture is something that does concern us often. Like is another popular one, and like sorry, it just has to go. ASAP. Just imagine the English language without any likes. And I hate that you think of the recently conceived noun-like before the standard verb-like. (That doesn’t mean I don’t encourage several noun-likes below this post.)

Words being so emotive, I feel I’ve made some emotional assumptions about the countries above, based on the words they hate. There’s no best and worst (worst being also one of my personal worst words), but there’s something about Netherlands’ hated words that make my eyes moist (sorry, not sorry). If I had to choose a country to win in the World’s Worst Words Competition to banish all five words forever, I’d go for Australia. Their list is pretty self-explanatory.

What are some words you hate? If you’re from any of the above countries, do you agree with your respective list?

Come and say Hello (or some other greeting you prefer) on Goodreads! : https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/8134521.Amrita_Sarkar

Posted in Of Musicals

Of Music and Dance

Today is World Music Day and International Yoga Day. Now, I don’t know if you’re up for yoga, so I thought we’d do some bhangra – Punjabi social dancing – today to combine music and movement. This track is from the Hindi film Kal Ho Naa Ho, and reworks Roy Orbison’s classic into an irresistible dance number. 

Posted in Of Writingly

Book Review: Of Opinions!

 

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Of Opinions Book Cover

The lovely Kate M. Colby has written a truly awesome review of Of Opinions – the book!
If you’ve got yourself a copy, or have been  wondering whether you should part with your hard-earned money over it, read Kate’s review and find out!

Here is the review by Kate: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/2028784581
Continue reading “Book Review: Of Opinions!”

Posted in Of Culturel

Of Taxes

 

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Indian Food at a Restaurant (Courtesy: Pixabay)

The only difference between death and taxes is that death doesn’t get worse every time Congress meets. – Will Rogers

The upcoming Goods and Services Tax (a.k.a. GST) in India has taken precedence over conversations about the weather, cricket and why Bahubali had to die in Bahubali 2. Some of this won’t be familiar to my worldwide readership (about which I will always brag), but taxation is a universal experience. And forgive my inability to resist any given opportunity to pun, but few things can be more taxing. Continue reading “Of Taxes”